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Grade 11 - World Religions and Belief Traditions: Issues, and Challenges: Social and political contexts

This course enables students to study world religions and belief traditions in local, Canadian, and global contexts. Students will explore aspects of the human quest for meaning and will examine world religions and beliefs.

Suggested Databases: UCDSB VLC

21 Century Canadian Connections

Canadian Connections: Teacher prompt: “What was the reason for the French legislation on secularism and conspicuous religious symbols, and what response has it prompted?”

Analyse the ways in which religious pluralism is reflected in Canadian society and culture (e.g., demographics, government policy)

Teacher prompt: “How does the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms encourage or discourage religious plurality?”

Goals: To develop their understanding of the connections between religion and social, ethical, and philosophical issues as well as personal psychological needs and concerns. (Humanities On.Curr.Doc)

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The federal government of Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau declared its commitment to the principle of multiculturalism in 1971 and in so doing formalized a policy to protect and promote diversity, recognize the rights of Aboriginal peoples, and support the use of Canada’s two official languages. This led to the establishment in 1973 of the Ministry of Multiculturalism as well as the Canadian Consultative Council on Multiculturalism..

Anniversaries such as Canada Day are a good time to take stock of long-term changes in the lifestyles, attitudes and values that characterize our society. Incremental changes can seem matter of fact as they unfold in daily life, but their cumulative effects can be remarkable.
In 1960, Canada was a different place and Canadians were a different people.

Top Picks:: Videos, Websites, & Links...

To develop their understanding of the connections between religion and social, ethical, and philosophical issues as well as personal psychological needs and concerns.

Teacher prompts: “In what ways does globalization increase the need for us to learn about the belief traditions of others?” “How does a study of history show us the importance of understanding diverse belief traditions?” Evaluate the influence of prejudice on public perceptions of the practices of various religious institutions and belief traditions (e.g., common public perceptions and misconceptions related to wearing the kirpan, jihad, proselytism, First Nations’ use of tobacco and sweetgrass) 

These courses also examine critical issues facing world religions and their adherents today. 

In this short film, a 17-year-old girl refuses medical treatment that will prolong her life due to religious convictions. Her decision remains firm despite the pleas of her physician, who begins to question who has the right to determine a person's life or death.

A group of Syrian women, refugees recently resettled in Canada, are negotiating life in their new home. They have some questions. Directed by Ann Marie Fleming, one of the original FFM filmmakers.

Sharia in Canada is a 2-part documentary series that delves into the debate over Islamic tribunals in Ontario. In December 2004, the Boyd Report recommended that Ontario authorize Islamic tribunals based on the sharia, a system of justice directly inspired by the Koran. In September 2005, however, Ontario premier Dalton McGuinty banned all religious arbitration, whether Muslim, Jewish or Christian.  Over those 10 months, a heated debate played out across the country and revealed the contradictions of multiculturalism. Sharia in Canada seeks to illustrate this debate by drawing upon a cross-section of opinions and, in particular, the views of Muslim women.

Canadian Connections:

Teacher prompts: “How does the reference to God in the Canadian national anthem reflect the values of a multicultural society?” “How do Remembrance Day ceremonies employ and reflect elements of religious ritual?”

Digging Deeper:

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Key Terms - Define & explain.

Key Terms: influence of prejudice , public perceptions , practices ,religious institutions,belief traditions (e.g., common public perceptions and misconceptions related to wearing the kirpan, jihad, proselytism, First Nations’ use of tobacco and sweetgrass) 

Starting Your Research Essay - Research Template

Learn to use a variety of sources:

Locate a variety of primary sources

(e.g., interviews, observations, surveys, questionnaires, original documents in print or other media – film, photographs, songs, advertisements, sacred texts) and/or secondary sources (e.g., book reviews, textbooks, websites, brochures, newspaper articles) .

Useful search terms:

Traditions: Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Taoism, African Religions, Folk Religions; New Religions

Subjects: ; human culture and society; church history, missions, comparative religion, world religions and religious studies; theology  global;diversity.

Start planning your assignment, with this handy

Research Template!  Research Template

Presentation tools: VLC

Digging Deeper: Websites for further research

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Analyse the ways in which popular culture uses traditional symbols, ideas, and other elements associated with various religions and belief traditions (e.g., the use of dream catchers and crucifixes as decorative objects or fashion accessories, the use of sacred Hindu symbols in tattoos) Teacher prompts: “Why might the use of a dream catcher as a decorative item offend First Nation people?” “Why might it be inappropriate for movie stars and popular musicians to use the crucifix as a fashion accessory?” “What are the positive and negative effects of the commercialization of yoga and of Hindu symbols and practices?”