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Grade 11 - World Religions and Belief Traditions: Issues, and Challenges: Introduction

This course enables students to study world religions and belief traditions in local, Canadian, and global contexts. Students will explore aspects of the human quest for meaning and will examine world religions and beliefs.

Ontario Curriculum - (HRT-3M & HRF-3O)

World Religions and Belief Traditions in Daily Life -  HRT 3M - Page 358-4081 

This course provides students with opportunities to explore various world religions and belief traditions. Students will develop knowledge of the terms and concepts relevant to this area of study, will examine the ways in which religions and belief traditions meet various human needs, and will learn about the relationship between belief and action. They will examine sacred writings and teachings, consider how concepts of time and place influence different religions and belief traditions, and develop research and inquiry skills related to the study of human expressions of belief. Prerequisite: None

World Religions and Belief Traditions: Perspectives, Issues, and Challenges -  HRF 30 - Page 381-408 

Suggested Databases - UCDSB: Virtual Learning Common's

Gr. 9-12: Teacher Resources

21 Century Canadian Connections

 Analyse how specific laws or historical events have affected relationships between the state and groups holding particular religious beliefs.

Teacher prompt: “Why was the inclusion of smudging during the swearing in of Paul Martin’s cabinet a milestone in the relationship between the Canadian government and Canada’s Aboriginal people?” ( Curr. Doc. )

Introduction to : The two World Religions courses (HRT3M & HRF3O),

In the two world religions courses (HRT3M & HRF3O), in the social sciences and humanities curriculum, students develop their understanding of the connections between religion and social, ethical, and philosophical issues as well as personal psychological needs and concerns. These courses also examine critical issues facing world religions and their adherents today.  This course enables students to study world religions and belief traditions in local, Canadian, and global contexts.

 

 Teacher prompt “What steps might you take to enhance your research/inquiry skills?” “What questions arise from the results of your research?”

Locate a variety of primary sources (e.g., interviews, observations, surveys, questionnaires, original documents in print or other media – film, photographs, songs, advertisements, sacred texts) and/or secondary sources (e.g., book reviews, textbooks, websites, brochures, newspaper articles) .

Start Your Research Using this Handy Template:

Useful search terms:

Traditions: Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Taoism, African Religions, Folk Religions; New Religions

Subjects: ; human culture and society; church history, missions, comparative religion, world religions and religious studies; theology  global;diversity.

Start planning your assignment, with this handy

Research Template!

 Teacher prompt “What steps might you take to enhance your research/inquiry skills?” “What questions arise from the results of your research?”

Locate a variety of primary sources (e.g., interviews, observations, surveys, questionnaires, original documents in print or other media – film, photographs, songs, advertisements, sacred texts) and/or secondary sources (e.g., book reviews, textbooks, websites, brochures, newspaper articles) 

Digging Deeper: Understanding Bias

Three Kinds of Bias That Shape Your Worldview - Menza for Kids 

Explore the differences between a belief system and a bias. Define the three biases Dr. Shepherd explores. Did you have the “Oh, I know that!” moment he said you would with any of them?    Identify biases that may inform their own perspective on religions and belief traditions (e.g., anthropocentricism, an individualistic rather than a community orientation, a predisposition to value science over faith, a predisposition to privilege written rather than oral sources)

To identify biases that may inform their own perspective on religions and belief traditions (e.g., anthropocentricism, an individualistic rather than a community orientation, a predisposition to value science over faith, a predisposition to privilege written rather than oral sources)

Key Terms - Define and Explain

KEY Terms: Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Taoism, African Religions, Folk Religions; New Religions, Define and appropriately use terms and concepts related to the study of world religions and belief traditions (e.g., agnosticism, atheism, belief, clergy, conservative, creed, cult, custom, deity, denomination, divine, ecumenism, faith, fundamentalism, habit, interfaith dialogue, laity, liberal, monotheism, mysticism, orthodoxy, pantheism, polytheism, profane, reform, ritual, sacred, secular, supernatural, tradition) 

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L. Jeanne Johnston
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BCIVS - Brockville Collegiate Institute and Vocational School - Brockville Family of Schools

Digging Deeper:

Useful Databases and Web-sites

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